Losing Kei

Losing Kei

Suzanne Kamata / May 26, 2020
Losing Kei A young mother fights impossible odds to be reunited with her child in this acutely insightful first novel about an intercultural marriage gone terribly wrong Jill Parker is an American painter living
  • Title: Losing Kei
  • Author: Suzanne Kamata
  • ISBN: 9780972898492
  • Page: 324
  • Format: Paperback
  • A young mother fights impossible odds to be reunited with her child in this acutely insightful first novel about an intercultural marriage gone terribly wrong.Jill Parker is an American painter living in Japan Far from the trendy gaijin neighborhoods of downtown Tokyo, she s settled in a remote seaside village where she makes ends meet as a bar hostess Her world appearsA young mother fights impossible odds to be reunited with her child in this acutely insightful first novel about an intercultural marriage gone terribly wrong.Jill Parker is an American painter living in Japan Far from the trendy gaijin neighborhoods of downtown Tokyo, she s settled in a remote seaside village where she makes ends meet as a bar hostess Her world appears to open when she meets Yusuke, a savvy and sensitive art gallery owner who believes in her talent But their love affair, and subsequent marriage, is doomed to a life of domestic hell, for Yusuke is the chonan, the eldest son, who assumes the role of rigid patriarch in his traditional family while Jill s duty is that of a servile Japanese wife A daily battle of wills ensues as Jill resists instruction in the proper womanly arts Even the long anticipated birth of a son, Kei, fails to unite them Divorce is the only way out, but in Japan a foreigner has no rights to custody, and Jill must choose between freedom and abandoning her child.Told with tenderness, humor, and an insider s knowledge of contemporary Japan, Losing Kei is the debut novel of an exceptional expatriate voice.Suzanne Kamata s work has appeared in over one hundred publications She is the editor of The Broken Bridge Fiction from Expatriates in Literary Japan and a forthcoming anthology from Beacon Press on parenting children with disabilities A five time nominee for the Pushcart Prize, she has twice won the Nippon Airways Wingspan Fiction Contest.
    Losing Kei Kamata, Suzanne Books Feb , In the end, Losing Kei is about than a mother s separation from her son, it s a journey of self discovery and personal growth for a woman living as an expatriate, trying to find her way in a culture that is often dismissive if not hostile to others. Losing Kei by Suzanne Kamata Losing Kei is a marvelous exploration of the confusions, tensions and joys of living and loving in Japan Id put it on my list of highly insightful novels about Japan for the way it explores how foreigners survive, thrive, and occasionally stumble and fall, inside Japanese society. Losing Kei by Suzanne Kamata, Paperback Barnes Noble Jul , Told with tenderness, humor, and an insider s knowledge of contemporary Japan, Losing Kei is the debut novel of an exceptional expatriate voice Suzanne Kamata s work has appeared in over one hundred publications. Losing Kei Kindle edition by Kamata, Suzanne Literature Told with tenderness, humor, and an insider s knowledge of contemporary Japan, Losing Kei is the debut novel of an exceptional expatriate voice Suzanne Kamata s work has appeared in over one hundred publications. Suzanne Kamata Losing Kei Losing Kei tells the story of Jill Parker, an American landscape painter living in Japan, a fish out of water who makes ends meet as a lowly bar hostess When she falls in love with Yusuke, a savvy and sensitive gallery owner, she begins to feel she might finally be Losing Kei by Suzanne Kamata OverDrive Rakuten Told with tenderness, humor, and an insider s knowledge of contemporary Japan, Losing Kei is the debut novel of an exceptional expatriate voice Suzanne Kamata s work has appeared in over one hundred publications. Losing Kei Japan Today May , Losing Kei also underscores the shortcomings of Japan s divorce laws When Jill finally decides to leave her husband, she assumes she will at least get shared custody of Kei, only to learn that such arrangements are rare. Losing Kei Walmart Losing Kei Average rating out of stars, based on reviews Write a review Suzanne Kamata . . Out of stock Qty Get In Stock Alert Delivery not available Pickup not available Sold shipped by Grand Eagle Retail Return policy Add to List Add to Registry. Losing Kei by Suzanne Kamata Reading Room Jan , But Kei is lost to her The laws are such that, she has no rights over her son Jill tries to cope up with it but she also has financial constraints to fight it legally This book made an interesting read. Suzanne Kamata New Losing Kei Short Story Collection The Beautiful One Has Come Chidren s Picture Book Playing for Papa En el equipo de papa Anthologies Call Me Okaasan Adventures in Multicultural Mothering Love You to Pieces Creative Writers on Raising a Child with Special Needs.
    • UNLIMITED BOOK Ó Losing Kei - by Suzanne Kamata
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      Published :2020-02-23T17:38:21+00:00

    About "Suzanne Kamata"

      • Suzanne Kamata

        Five time Pushcart Prize nominee Suzanne Kamata is the author of the novels The Mermaids of Lake Michigan Wyatt Mackenzie, 2017 , Screaming Divas Merit Press, 2014 , Gadget Girl The Art of Being Invisible GemmaMedia, 2013 and Losing Kei Leapfrog Press, 2008 , and editor of three anthologies The Broken Bridge Fiction from Expatriates in Literary Japan, Love You to Pieces Creative Writers on Raising a Child with Special Needs, and Call Me Okaasan Adventures in Multicultural Mothering Wyatt Mackenzie Publishing, 2009 Her short fiction and essays have appeared widely She was a winner in the novel category of the Half the World Global Literati Award.

    216 Comments

    1. Losing Kei is a marvelous exploration of the confusions, tensions and joys of living and loving in Japan I d put it on my list of highly insightful novels about Japan for the way it explores how foreigners survive, thrive, and occasionally stumble and fall, inside Japanese society The main character rings true to me after 20 years living in Japan, as a character doing her best in a challenging environment She struggles yet understands, loves and loses with dignity It s hard to ask of a characte [...]


    2. I really liked this book It wasn t slow and it wasn t fast It was interesting to go through the struggle with the main character and feel her emtions on losing her child and not a thing she can do about it I thought the writing style was great I could picture everything clearly.


    3. Losing Kei A NovelWritten By Suzanne KamataPublished By Leapfrog PressDate January 1st, 2008Pages 195Format PaperbackISBN 978 0972898492Losing Kei is a wonderful book this story guides the reader through a gauntlet of emotions while it reveals some distressing Japanese customs, laws and rituals Suzanne Kamata writes an intensely poignant novel that will tug at the heartstrings of any mother or father who reads it Losing Kei transported me to Japan where I stayed from the beginning of the book ri [...]


    4. How do you choose between your child and freedom from an overbearing mother in law and a husband who s not what you d expected In a country where foreigners have no custody rights following a divorce, how do you get your child back Suzanne Kamata raises these questions in Losing Kei, as Jill Parker comes to terms with the consequences of her decision.Jill s story instantly drew me in, but I also enjoyed Losing Kei because Kamata does a wonderful job showing what it s like for an outsider to try [...]


    5. Kamata chose a rich premise for her novel an American woman divorces her Japanese husband and loses custody of her little boy I am disappointed she didn t do with it She created a central character, Jill, who is self absorbed, views men as her ticket to elsewhere, wallows in self pity, and has superficial relationships with other women In fact, Jill doesn t experience true love until she has a baby This does not bode well for the baby .


    6. This story had so much promise, but I felt that it fell short Jill was naive and stupid and never really seemed to learn from her mistakes As well, I had hoped the story would tell about her legal battle and experiences with the court system, but instead, we had to read about her jaunts to foreign lands to see old flames Again, so much potential, especially given recent headlines about Americans struggles to bring their children home from Japan, but falling short.


    7. This book is a fast read keeps you riveted Tells a story about a foreign woman married to a Japanese man what happens when the woman divorces the man with a male child involved Great story


    8. Borrowed from another reader s review, As with a lot of other novels by ex pat writers, personal peeves about Japan abound In fact, I suspect that s what drives people to write about Japan than anything to vent at the wacky society we live in hereIn the first half of the book, her pet peeves are mixed in with plenty of Wow, isn t Japan strange stereotypes But while her treatment of all things Japanese is a bit in your face, it is quite accurate I would recommend this book to anybody who is thin [...]



    9. I enjoyed reading this story about a woman living in Japan who gets married to a Japanese man and has a child together They get divorced and she loses custody of her son, and she is bereft.


    10. Wonderful book A true privilege to read and review Suzanne Kamata writes a wonderfully effective novel about lives of expat women and foreign mothers in Japan.



    11. I really enjoyed this book It was well written and easy to read The writer has such an easy style that you simply fall into the story and her great descriptions and story.


    12. Thank you Michael Pronko for recommending this book It was a very interesting look at an expat s life married to and divorced from a Japanese man A good insight into the way things work in Japan I found the characters believable, though I agonized over some of the choices they made I really felt for the child who seemed to be the whipping boy in the whole sorry affair He is the one who was most injured it seemed to me This is a novel and I would be curious to find some non fiction, like True Cri [...]


    13. There s an old quote that says A mother who is really a mother is never free This, as any mother knows couldn t be true and unfortunately Jill Parker finds this out the hard way in this wonderful book by Suzanne Kamata.Jill is reeling from a bad relationship, and instead of traveling to Africa, the site of her now ex boyfriend, she decides to take a fellowship to Japan for a fresh start She falls in love with the culture, and soon with one of its residents, Yusuke Yamashiro They have a whirlwin [...]


    14. One gloomy spring day I was searching the shelves of Seattle s Kinokuniya Books, hoping for something good to read A paperback caught my eye and I examined it Losing Kei, written by an American woman who lives in Japan Always eager for another cross cultural perspective,I took it home It was stunning Five years later, it still haunts me The story of a woman fighting her Japanese husband for custody of their son is honest, illuminating, and deeply sad The strength and authority of the writing is [...]


    15. Losing Kei was a good, fast read I finished it in a little the 1 night I just had a hard time putting it down It was an interesting look into family dynamics in Japan It is quite sad how few rights mothers have in that country.I really enjoyed the main character s story and her sense of adventure The only bad thing about the book was that is was a little on the short side


    16. It felt as if there were multiple people writing this book Slow and drawn out by the time I hit page 136 it switched gears and suddenly read like an adolescent would write I wasn t really a fan of the flipping back and forth between the years either as it didn t really flow well for me.



    17. I am not a reader but this book kept me turning pages Things really get heart pounding at the end so much so that I secretly finished it while at my work desk in a half sized browser window


    18. I liked the book and got so into it, that I thought it was a non fiction story when actually it is fiction The only criticism I have is the writing style, sometimes it was disjointed.


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